skynews

Twitter feeds, live podcasts and video are pumping out reports of the G20 riots in the City with breathless excitement. The #G20 tag on Twitter is brimming over with posts. As Tweeter robcthegeek just pointed out, journalists are rather enjoying channeling the mayhem.

Amid frenetic news of RBS’ windows being smashed, office equipment being thrown out and even an armoured car being stopped by police, a bit of comedy has been peeping through. A few nice Tweets I’ve picked out:

andrewnorfolk: “HAH, #G20 protesters smash RBS windows, it’s nationalised you morons!”

 

davidteather: “It is like apocalypse now, but with decent food”

 

rachelwilliams2: “‘This is the worst festival i’ve ever been to’ quips one man as we are squeezed round a corner by a police line”

 

madduane: “Saw a sign in the G20 protest coverage that said “Capitalism Isn’t Working.” I couldn’t help but wonder what a pro banner like that costs.”

 

JasonGregory“Can someone tell the man smashing the RBS windows that he (presuming he is a taxpayer) will have to pay for that. #G20”

 

tuileries: “The thing is, the British and their protests, it’s all just anoraks & rucksacks. If we were French the water cannons wld be out by now.”

 

In the background on the Sky News radio feed, you can hear Bob Marley’s ‘Redemption Song’ being murdered by a handful of unwashed students with a guitar.

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Two fairly spectacular stories are vying for attention on the Sunday papers’ front pages today. The Mail on Sunday claimed Tory frontbencher Damian Green was the victim of a government entrapment operation involving Whitehall whistleblower Christopher Galley. The Independent on Sunday suggested the shadow immigration minister’s Parliamentary office may have been bugged. The Observer and The Sunday Telegraph led with stories focusing on the Mumbai terrorist attacks and fraying relations between India and Pakistan.

Andrew Marr, often criticised for being too soft on top ranking politicians, gave Jacqui Smith a nightmare over the Damian Green affair this morning. My favourite excerpt from the interview:

ANDREW MARR: Damian Green clearly believes that he was bugged – that his BlackBerry was bugged, his phone was bugged. Now if that was the case, you would have had to have proved that, wouldn’t you?

JACQUI SMITH: If that were the case, I would have signed a warrant. jacqui-smith

ANDREW MARR: Did you sign any such warrant?

JACQUI SMITH: Andrew… No. Andrew…

ANDREW MARR: Sorry, I just… these are quite important questions.

JACQUI SMITH: Well because I’m sorry, Andrew, home secretaries don’t confirm or deny which warrants they have or have not signed. But, frankly, you know let me be clear about this, we are getting totally into conspiracy theory territory here.

ANDREW MARR: So you didn’t sign such a warrant?

JACQUI SMITH: Totally into conspiracy theory territory.

Hmmm. I think I side with William Hague when he described Smith’s responses as “inadequate”. As Marr rightly pointed out prior to the interview, leaking briefings has always been the bread and butter of political journalism, and no group of people has handed over more sensitive material to the press over the years than Gordon Brown and his comrades. Worrying times for whistleblowers everywhere.